HIV Transmission

Understanding how HIV can and cannot be transmitted is at the core of preventing new infections. HIV is a rapidly changing virus but, thankfully, it is also entirely preventable. Below are several key points to understand in order to avoid contracting the virus.

#1HIV Must Be Present

Infection may only occur if one of the people involved in an exposure situation is infected with HIV. Some people assume that certain behaviors or exposure situations can cause HIV disease, even if the virus is not present. This is not true.

#2There Needs to Be Enough Virus

The concentration of HIV determines whether infection will occur. In blood, for example, the virus is very concentrated. A small amount of blood is enough to infect someone. The concentration of virus in blood or other fluids can change, in the same person, over time.

#3HIV Must Get Into the Bloodstream

It is not enough to be in contact with an infected fluid for HIV to be transmitted. Healthy, intact skin does not allow HIV to get into the body.

HIV can enter through an open cut or sore, or through contact with the mucous membranes. Transmission risk is very high when HIV comes in contact with the more porous mucous membranes in the genitals, the anus, and the rectum which are inefficient barriers to HIV. Transmission is also possible through oral sex because body fluids can enter the bloodstream through cuts in the mouth.

Infectious Fluids – HIV can be transmitted from an infected person to another through:

  • Blood
  • Semen (including pre–seminal fluid)
  • Vaginal secretions
  • HIV can also be transmitted through breast milk expressed through feeding, in limited circumstances, where there is exposure to large quantities.

HIV Transmission Routes

HIV can enter the body through open cuts or sores and by directly infecting cells in the mucous membranes. Transmission can happen through the mouth, the eyes, vagina, penis (through the urethra), in the anus and rectum. HIV cannot cross healthy, unbroken skin. Transmission can occur during sexual and non–sexual activities.

Sexual Transmission

Sexual activity is the most common way for HIV to be transmitted. HIV can be transmitted through sexual intercourse, both vaginal and anal. HIV can easily pass through the mucus membranes in the genitals and the rectum, or may pass through cuts and sores.

HIV can also be transmitted through oral sex. Conditions such as bleeding gums and poor oral health increase the risk of transmission through oral sex.

Anal Sex

Anal sex without a condom is the riskiest activity for HIV transmission. The receptive partner is at the greatest risk because anal tissue is easily bruised or torn during sex which then provides easy access to the bloodstream for HIV carried in semen. The insertive partner is also at some risk because the membranes inside the urethra can provide entry for HIV, into the bloodstream. The presence of other sexually transmitted diseases can increase the risk of HIV transmission during anal sex.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission during anal sex.

Vaginal Sex

Unprotected vaginal sex is also considered risky for HIV transmission. The female is at the greatest risk because the lining of the vagina is a mucous membrane which can provide easy access to the bloodstream for HIV carried in semen. The male is also at some risk because the membranes inside the urethra can provide an entry for HIV into the bloodstream. The presence of other sexually transmitted diseases can increase the risk of HIV transmission during vaginal sex.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission during vaginal sex.

Oral Sex with a Man

The risk of HIV transmission through oral sex with a man is very low because the mouth is an unfriendly environment for HIV. Saliva contains enzymes that break down the virus and the mucous membranes in the mouth are more protective than anal or vaginal tissue. There are a few documented cases where it appears that HIV was transmitted orally and those cases are attributed to ejaculation into the mouth.

The minimal risk of transmission from oral sex with a man is only for the person performing the oral sex. Open cuts and abrasions in the mouth or bleeding gums can create an entry point for HIV and increase the risk of transmission. A person receiving oral sex is generally not at risk because that person is coming into contact only with saliva, which does not transmit HIV. The presence of other sexually transmitted diseases can increase the risk of HIV transmission during oral sex.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission during oral sex with a man.

Oral Sex with a Woman

The risk of transmission through oral sex with a woman is very low because the mouth is an unfriendly environment for HIV. Saliva breaks down the virus and the mucous membranes in the mouth are more protective than anal or vaginal tissue. The minimal risk of transmission from oral sex with a woman is only for the person performing the oral sex as their mouth is in contact with vaginal fluid. However, there is little data documenting HIV transmission via oral sex from an infected woman to an uninfected person.

Performing oral sex on a woman who is menstruating increases the risk because blood has more HIV than vaginal fluid. A person receiving oral sex is generally not at risk, because that person is coming into contact only with saliva, which does not transmit HIV. The presence of other sexually transmitted diseases can increase the risk of HIV transmission during oral sex.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission during oral sex with a woman.

Oral to Anal Sex

Oral to anal contact (rimming) poses minimal risk for HIV transmission. However, rimming is a risk for transmission of hepatitis, parasites, and many other sexually transmitted diseases.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission during oral–anal sex.

Non–sexual Transmission

HIV can be transmitted by contact between infectious fluids and bleeding cuts or open sores in the skin. However, healthy intact skin does not allow HIV to enter the body, and provides an excellent barrier against the virus.

Injection Drug Use

Sharing syringes [needles, works or fits] poses a very high risk for HIV transmission. It is the most efficient way to transmit the virus as it passes blood directly from one person's blood stream to another's. Sharing syringes is also a very efficient way to transmit other blood borne viruses such as Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission during injection drug use.

Tattoos and Piercings

There have been no documented cases of transmission of HIV by piercing or tattooing. However, there are documented cases of Hepatitis B transmission. Since Hepatitis B and HIV are transmitted by the same activities, there may be a possibility of HIV transmission through tattoos and piercing.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission during tattooing and piercing.

Mother to Infant Transmission

It is possible for a mother who has HIV to pass the virus to her baby, by exposure to blood and vaginal fluids during birth, or through breast milk during feeding.

Learn how to reduce your risk of HIV transmission from mother to infant.

AIDSLine

Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

612–373–AIDS (Metro)
800–248–AIDS (Toll Free)

Stop the Noise, get tested

Watch the video
>>

Donate

CONTACT AIDSLINE

Questions about HIV? Contact the AIDSLine.

HIV RISK ASSESSMENT

Understand your risk with our HIV Risk Assessment.

HIV SERVICES LOCATOR

Living with HIV? Our HIV Services Locator can help.

Content Notice: This site contains HIV prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all audiences. Since HIV infection is spread primarily though sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics. If you are not seeking such information or materials, please exit this website. The Minnesota AIDS Project is not responsible for content of external websites.

Minnesota AIDS Project is a 501(c)(3) charity, tax ID: 41-1524746

© 2014 Minnesota AIDS Project, 1400 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55404 | Phone: 612-341-2060 | Toll Free: 800-243-7321| | AIDSLine